Sunday, 18 April 2010

#voteglobal

The Green Party Manifesto was launched late last week. The document was largely authored by my friend, leading political scientist Dr. Andy Dobson.
 
Here, on a day of blogging about global poverty, are some key excerpts from the Manifeto that concern relevant matters, on which this my Party is very strong and distinctive:

The Green Manifesto promotes the concept of 'ecological debt', recognising that rich countries have already imposed billions of pounds worth of damage on poorer countries through their greenhouse gas emissions.

The Greens propose that at least 1% of UK Gross National Product is spent on aid by 2011. This would be targeted for the poorest, not involve economic policy conditions, respect gender equality and not be diverted to equipping security forces.

The Green Party would ensure that UK companies operating abroad adhere to environmental and human rights standards and would encourage countries with which the UK works to implement core International Labour Organization standards.

In order to address the reasons funds flow out of developing countries, the Greens pledge to deliver 100% debt cancellation, to crack down on tax havens (including country by country reporting) and to implement and enforce international conventions against corruption.

The Green Party manifesto takes a clear position against 'free trade' which has caused greater poverty through increased instability, lower wages and little environmental protection. As an alternative, the Green Party would ensure that trade deals, whether global or with the European Union, allow developing countries to retain control over their economies and do not force through deregulation and liberalisation. We need localisation, not 'globalisation'.

Also on the international level, the Greens would turn the World Trade Organisation into a General Agreement on Sustainable Trade, which, together with a reformed International Monetary Fund (IMF), would better reflect the interests of smaller countries. The Greens would both work for an international arms trade treaty and reduce arms sales worldwide by ending government support for arms exports.

The Greens stand for a global treaty on climate change based on a 'Contraction and Convergence' framework in which poorer countries reduce emissions more slowly than rich countries (and in some cases increase them slightly). This would require a UK carbon dioxide emissions reduction target of 10% a year, with the aim of reducing emissions by 90 per cent from 1990 levels by 2030 and 65 per cent by 2020.

In order to fund the US$150 billion a year of finance that is required for poor countries to adapt to climate change, the Green Party favours the idea of a Robin Hood tax (also known as a financial transactions tax or Tobin tax) on the value of every financial transaction between financial institutions worldwide.

http://www.voteglobal.org.uk/news/green-party-launches-election-2010-manifesto/
 

3 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

It is true to say that the Green Party UK were the first of the all the UK political parties to make Contraction and Convergence [C&C] a manifesto commitment.

In about 1991, four members of the party acting together in group called the Global Commons Institute [GCI], did the ground work that led to the C&C proposition. Since that time C&C has become recognized as a what Ross Garnaut of the Australian Government called a 'global standard', from which all other approaches to meeting the goal of the UNFCCC owe their origins.

The Green Party UK deserves recognition, amongst many things, for that.

C&C was fundamental to COP-15 and a state of play document is here: -
http://www.tangentfilms.com/AF.swf

18 April 2010 at 15:34  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

nah,

Clegg all the way mate!

18 April 2010 at 23:42  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

As you say, the Chomsky article you link to is a must read.

It says a lot about, er, people like you Rupert.

20 April 2010 at 00:06  

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The Green Party Manifesto was launched late last week. The document was largely authored by my friend, leading political scientist Dr. Andy Dobson.
 
Here, on a day of blogging about global poverty, are some key excerpts from the Manifeto that concern relevant matters, on which this my Party is very strong and distinctive:

The Green Manifesto promotes the concept of 'ecological debt', recognising that rich countries have already imposed billions of pounds worth of damage on poorer countries through their greenhouse gas emissions.

The Greens propose that at least 1% of UK Gross National Product is spent on aid by 2011. This would be targeted for the poorest, not involve economic policy conditions, respect gender equality and not be diverted to equipping security forces.

The Green Party would ensure that UK companies operating abroad adhere to environmental and human rights standards and would encourage countries with which the UK works to implement core International Labour Organization standards.

In order to address the reasons funds flow out of developing countries, the Greens pledge to deliver 100% debt cancellation, to crack down on tax havens (including country by country reporting) and to implement and enforce international conventions against corruption.

The Green Party manifesto takes a clear position against 'free trade' which has caused greater poverty through increased instability, lower wages and little environmental protection. As an alternative, the Green Party would ensure that trade deals, whether global or with the European Union, allow developing countries to retain control over their economies and do not force through deregulation and liberalisation. We need localisation, not 'globalisation'.

Also on the international level, the Greens would turn the World Trade Organisation into a General Agreement on Sustainable Trade, which, together with a reformed International Monetary Fund (IMF), would better reflect the interests of smaller countries. The Greens would both work for an international arms trade treaty and reduce arms sales worldwide by ending government support for arms exports.

The Greens stand for a global treaty on climate change based on a 'Contraction and Convergence' framework in which poorer countries reduce emissions more slowly than rich countries (and in some cases increase them slightly). This would require a UK carbon dioxide emissions reduction target of 10% a year, with the aim of reducing emissions by 90 per cent from 1990 levels by 2030 and 65 per cent by 2020.

In order to fund the US$150 billion a year of finance that is required for poor countries to adapt to climate change, the Green Party favours the idea of a Robin Hood tax (also known as a financial transactions tax or Tobin tax) on the value of every financial transaction between financial institutions worldwide.

http://www.voteglobal.org.uk/news/green-party-launches-election-2010-manifesto/
 
30. 31. 32.