Monday, 20 October 2008

Earlham families save trees from the axe

Story From Norwich Evening News

Concerned people who live near a new housing development in Earlham have been victorious in safeguarding trees.

Persimmon Homes is currently building a development of 42 three-storey houses on land between Gipsy Lane and Earlham Road.

But the work has already caused controversy after the housing developer felled about 17 trees, angering people living nearby.

Neighbouring families have since been keeping a close eye on progression at the site and recently discovered workers were building what they believed to be a garage close to trees that were subject to a tree preservation order.

Their concerns were initially put to one side but following a series of emails and a meeting with the site manager, the housing developer has vowed it will not do anything to harm these trees.

Gerard Crook, 52, who lives with his partner Denise Denis on Gipsy Lane, said: “I was being a nosy neighbour on the behalf of other residents and what we discovered was that a structure was being set out what appeared to be rather close to our boundary and very close to the trees.

“The site manager said the structure was set out according to the plans but there were no trees on the plans.

“The Green Party then drew my attention to a document that was in the planning agreement that storage of materials was not permitted and that building structure should be at least one metre away from the tree canopies.

“Anyway, the site manager has since told us that there are considering alternative plans for this structure and I'm very pleased that the company is not doing anything that might be harmful to the trees.

“Trees are attractive, natural feature that of looked after and for, can be part of our daily lives. Trees make a contribution to our world and environment and shouldn't be removed unnecessarily.”

Rupert Read, Green Party city councillor, said: “I am really glad that I was able to help Gerry and Denise in their successful effort to safeguard these trees, but the real credit must go to them: without their vigilance, I fear that we would have lost these trees.”

The property developer got the go ahead to build the houses at the end of July 2007.

Last October, residents claimed that 17 out of the 20 trees that had tree preservation orders (TPOs) on them were chopped down to make way for the development.

However, Persimmon Homes argued that the trees removed from the site had been agreed with city council officers and the city council confirmed that the trees were not protected.

The housing developer was contacted by the Evening News on the latest matter but no one was available to comment.

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Story From Norwich Evening News

Concerned people who live near a new housing development in Earlham have been victorious in safeguarding trees.

Persimmon Homes is currently building a development of 42 three-storey houses on land between Gipsy Lane and Earlham Road.

But the work has already caused controversy after the housing developer felled about 17 trees, angering people living nearby.

Neighbouring families have since been keeping a close eye on progression at the site and recently discovered workers were building what they believed to be a garage close to trees that were subject to a tree preservation order.

Their concerns were initially put to one side but following a series of emails and a meeting with the site manager, the housing developer has vowed it will not do anything to harm these trees.

Gerard Crook, 52, who lives with his partner Denise Denis on Gipsy Lane, said: “I was being a nosy neighbour on the behalf of other residents and what we discovered was that a structure was being set out what appeared to be rather close to our boundary and very close to the trees.

“The site manager said the structure was set out according to the plans but there were no trees on the plans.

“The Green Party then drew my attention to a document that was in the planning agreement that storage of materials was not permitted and that building structure should be at least one metre away from the tree canopies.

“Anyway, the site manager has since told us that there are considering alternative plans for this structure and I'm very pleased that the company is not doing anything that might be harmful to the trees.

“Trees are attractive, natural feature that of looked after and for, can be part of our daily lives. Trees make a contribution to our world and environment and shouldn't be removed unnecessarily.”

Rupert Read, Green Party city councillor, said: “I am really glad that I was able to help Gerry and Denise in their successful effort to safeguard these trees, but the real credit must go to them: without their vigilance, I fear that we would have lost these trees.”

The property developer got the go ahead to build the houses at the end of July 2007.

Last October, residents claimed that 17 out of the 20 trees that had tree preservation orders (TPOs) on them were chopped down to make way for the development.

However, Persimmon Homes argued that the trees removed from the site had been agreed with city council officers and the city council confirmed that the trees were not protected.

The housing developer was contacted by the Evening News on the latest matter but no one was available to comment.
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