Wednesday, 17 October 2007

The case for Co-Leaders

Congratulations again to all those elected in the Green Party Executive elections, particularly to Caroline Lucas MEP with her huge mandate as female ‘Principal Speaker’.

One of the reasons I support the proposal for change in our Leadership structures is that, provided that leading people put themselves forward in these ways, it potentially allows members to choose between a single and deputy leader and Co-leaders every two years, which currently they can’t do. For many this will I believe provide the ‘middle ground ‘ between the status quo and moving to a single leader.

Here is what I think might be a dream _Co-Leaders_ ticket: Adrian Ramsay and Caroline Lucas.

The huge extra profile that this would give Adrian, our Leader on Norwich City Council, could play a critical role in getting him into Westminster. Norwich is now clearly our second strongest Parliamentary prospect, after Brighton. Let’s get the referendum passed, and then get not just one but at least two MPs into Parliament -- our Co-Leaders...

Sure Caroline is pretty obvious as the outstanding Leader candidate. But why not do Leadership and do different at the same time?: Co-Leaders could be the way to go. It works in New Zealand, in Scotland, in Northern Ireland... why not here?

Alternatively, if you don’t like that idea: how about Caroline and Peter Tatchell as Co-Leaders? That would certainly guarantee us some profile!

At Green Party Conference last month, I spoke, in the leadership debate, in favour of Co-Leaders, as a reason for voting Yes. I’d like to quote here these words penned by Cllr. Matt Follett, on this topic:

“What was pretty clear from party conference last month, was that the current set up of Principal Speakers was not doing the party any favours and at the very least these titles and form of language had to change. The Green Party will in November vote in referendum for or against proposals to remove theses and in their place have a choice between Co-leaders or single/Deputy Leaders. A leading member of the 'No' camp in the referendum acknowledged publicly at Conference that ‘the status quo can’t remain whatever the result’. Similarly leading member of the Yes camp stated that ‘whatever the result I believe both sides share many ideas about what changes are needed and that they need to be realised quickly’.

It’s clear that those set against the leadership proposal are most concerned with the notion of a single leader. Interestingly, many undecided and new members wondered out loud what the middle ground might be. For me, the option of Co-Leaders in the proposal provides this. That doesn’t satisfy those for whom the very word leader or leaders shouldn’t be on any publications ever issued by the party, but there are many others, who are worried about a single figurehead, but who recognise the need to change, and who feel more comfortable with this prospect. Personally I think this shows up the flexibility of the proposal that we’ll be voting on next month, and demonstrates how much consultation and consensus was achieved in the drafting of it.”

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1. 2. 3. Rupert's Read: The case for Co-Leaders 4. 12. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 23. 24.

25. 26. The case for Co-Leaders 27. 28.

29.

Congratulations again to all those elected in the Green Party Executive elections, particularly to Caroline Lucas MEP with her huge mandate as female ‘Principal Speaker’.

One of the reasons I support the proposal for change in our Leadership structures is that, provided that leading people put themselves forward in these ways, it potentially allows members to choose between a single and deputy leader and Co-leaders every two years, which currently they can’t do. For many this will I believe provide the ‘middle ground ‘ between the status quo and moving to a single leader.

Here is what I think might be a dream _Co-Leaders_ ticket: Adrian Ramsay and Caroline Lucas.

The huge extra profile that this would give Adrian, our Leader on Norwich City Council, could play a critical role in getting him into Westminster. Norwich is now clearly our second strongest Parliamentary prospect, after Brighton. Let’s get the referendum passed, and then get not just one but at least two MPs into Parliament -- our Co-Leaders...

Sure Caroline is pretty obvious as the outstanding Leader candidate. But why not do Leadership and do different at the same time?: Co-Leaders could be the way to go. It works in New Zealand, in Scotland, in Northern Ireland... why not here?

Alternatively, if you don’t like that idea: how about Caroline and Peter Tatchell as Co-Leaders? That would certainly guarantee us some profile!

At Green Party Conference last month, I spoke, in the leadership debate, in favour of Co-Leaders, as a reason for voting Yes. I’d like to quote here these words penned by Cllr. Matt Follett, on this topic:

“What was pretty clear from party conference last month, was that the current set up of Principal Speakers was not doing the party any favours and at the very least these titles and form of language had to change. The Green Party will in November vote in referendum for or against proposals to remove theses and in their place have a choice between Co-leaders or single/Deputy Leaders. A leading member of the 'No' camp in the referendum acknowledged publicly at Conference that ‘the status quo can’t remain whatever the result’. Similarly leading member of the Yes camp stated that ‘whatever the result I believe both sides share many ideas about what changes are needed and that they need to be realised quickly’.

It’s clear that those set against the leadership proposal are most concerned with the notion of a single leader. Interestingly, many undecided and new members wondered out loud what the middle ground might be. For me, the option of Co-Leaders in the proposal provides this. That doesn’t satisfy those for whom the very word leader or leaders shouldn’t be on any publications ever issued by the party, but there are many others, who are worried about a single figurehead, but who recognise the need to change, and who feel more comfortable with this prospect. Personally I think this shows up the flexibility of the proposal that we’ll be voting on next month, and demonstrates how much consultation and consensus was achieved in the drafting of it.”

30. 31. 32.